Down the Rabbit Hole and how a question was answered

This week I thought I would ask a question about someone in my SIL’s tree. Remember the advice to stay focused? Well, I had a difficult time following my own advice to stay on track and stay focused on the question at hand.

Step away from the research.

After a brief break to refocus I zoomed in on one of her distant relatives, Minnie Bell Snyder. I did not have parents listed for her and there were only a few “hints” from Ancestry so I thought this would be a good road to go down. Who were Minnie Bell Snyders parents? I started out with the marriage record. Minnie was married on 12 July 1891 to Berkley Anderson in Belmont, Ohio.  This information was found in the Ohio, Compiled Marriage Index, 1803-1900. As this was only the index there was no record to view and no parents listed. I also found a marriage notice at Newspapers.com in the Belmont Chronicle on July 16.  Again, no parents listed.

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The West Virginia Birth Index lists Minnie as being born on 8 April 1870 to John C. and Nancy L. Snider. Different spelling of the last name. As this was just an index on Ancestry I headed over to wvculture.org to see if there was a record there. There were eleven Minnie Sniders listed. Ten were all listed with birthdates too late to be the one I wanted so the only left was the 8 April 1870, and there was a document showing her birth in Grant, WV. with parents John and Nancy. Just in case I also checked Minnie Snyder, spelled with a y. They too were born too late to be the one I wanted so I felt pretty sure that the record listing John and Nancy was the correct one.

Now to prove that the Minnie that was married to Berkley Anderson was the same Minnie born to John and Nancy Snider. Some of the trees on Ancestry had John and Nancy listed as parents but no one had any source for this information. Going back over the census from 1870 through their marriage, I find that Minnie and Berkley are both from Ellsworth, Tyler Co., WV so it makes sense that this is, in fact, the family I am researching. I also check Find A Grave and voilá, there is a listing for Minnie Bell Snider. It has a photo of the headstone, matching birthdate, matching husband and a death date of 30 July 1948. The cemetery is located in Canton, Stark Co. Ohio which is where I expected it to be or thereabouts according to later census records for the family. The memorial on Find A Grave does not mention parents so really all this did was confirm the other information I had found. I needed an obituary or death certificate  (if it lists parents) although with the previously mentioned census records I feel comfortable saying that John and Nancy are indeed her parents but it does not give me her mother’s maiden name, still need confirming documents!

The search continues.

Since it costs $25 to order a death certificate in Ohio and I have other things I need to order before this one, I decided to go on an obit hunt. Finding nothing in Newspapers.com or on My Heritage I just put the facts in a Google search and up popped an index that listed an obit in the newspaper The Repository from Canton, Ohio. I put in a request at the Stark County District Library for Minnie’s obit and they quickly responded with a digital copy. It did not mention Minnie’s parents but did mention two brothers. Oh, this is getting good!!!

One brother, Marshall, was listed as a sibling on the census forms and turns out to be George Marshall, but the other, Harvey, was not listed on the census. Delving a little further I find that her brother Thomas’ middle name was Harvey. Back to the wvculture.org site and I found not only Thomas Harvey Snider’s BC but his delayed BC which had both parents’ names and the mother’s maiden name! The certificate was signed by Minnie B. Anderson, sister. This is all the proof I need.

Minnie’s father’s full name is John Calvin Snider and her mother is Nancy Laura Gorrell. Question answered. From there it went pell-mell forward with the Gorrell family, but that is another post.

 

 

A Hunting We Will Go, Cemetery Hunting that is

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(the above photo is not the cemetery in my story but how I imagine it too look if it had headstones)

Looking for the cemetery in Forks of Coal, WV where my great grandfather Millard Stephens is buried has been a fascinating journey. It started when I asked the question about his death certificate. While doing that research, I became interested in all the places he had lived and then died. My mother often spoke about making the trip up to her grandmother’s house and visiting the cemetery, so I knew the general area and by general, I mean the Alum Creek and Forks of Coal, Kanawha Co. area.

The first thing I did was pull out some old emails from back in 2001 from my aunt and a gentleman that grew up in that area. She had sent me these correspondences long ago and I had them in a Stephens file. In the emails, it mentioned some directions that probably could be followed if you lived there and a story about a man, Jack Workman, living on the property. Well, now I had two clues.

The directions mention a four-lane highway built in the 1980’s crossing the Big Coal River between the Girl Scout Camp and the Cemetery. It also mentions some Hill’s being buried in that cemetery. Then there are the directions of turning off onto Rocky Point Road (not on the map) parking your car and walking down the old dirt road, around a hill, through a creek and back up the other side and on and on. This must have been where one lived when walking to school uphill both ways in the snow.

https://www.mapquest.com/embed/us/west-virginia/forks-of-coal-missionary-bapt-350421009?center=38.27049854747348,-81.79776191711426&zoom=14&maptype=undefined

I pulled up mapquest and zoomed into the Alum Creek area and found the Coal River. Following it down it forked into the Big Coal and Little Coal Rivers. According to the directions and my mom, the property I was looking for was near the Big Coal River where 119 (the four-lane highway) crosses. A quick search of the girl scout camp did not turn anything up but a few blurbs in the paper. Nothing to help. So, the mapping just narrowed the location.

Next, it was plugging in Jack Workman’s name into google. A fabulous article popped up which detailed how he donated this property to the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources. The article gave a good description of the property and I could easily find it on the map. The actual area is run by the Forks of Coal Foundation and on their site, I found a trail map. According to the trail map, only the area to the north of 119 is open to the public and the cemetery would be south of 119 according to the directions in the emails.

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The girl scout camp was not noted on the trail map but on the Facebook Page for the park, a wonderful hiker posted a photo of a plaque indicating the camp (and kindly give permission to use the photo). I contacted the contributor and he said if you follow the trail to the far right of the parking lot the camp was about 50m. Remembering the notes from the email the cemetery should be on the other side of 119 from the camp. I now had a much more approximate location. I would still like to find someone who knows exactly where it is though so I kept searching.

I put a call into the Forks of Coal Foundation and they put me in touch with a gentleman working with the donation of land. He was able to give me the coordinates to the cemetery and old home as he had been to the property. He also had copies of a few old deeds to the land which helped define the borders. We also discussed other names such as Hill and Chandler that might be in that same cemetery but that is a question for another week.

Millard Stephens Grave

What a wild ride. It just takes asking some questions and it can lead you to the answer. Many thanks to all the individuals who answered my emails and phone calls and shared their knowledge.

Where did Millard Stephens live?

A simple enough question and yet because I wanted to not only answer it but put it all on Google Earth Pro and make a quick movie out of it, it took waaaaayyyyy longer.

This is actually a fun project to do and you can do it for one person or for a family. It is fascinating to see where they lived and how they moved about. This movie is pretty basic but you can add photos of the homes you find and overlay old maps. You can really be creative. I do have one in the works with actual photos but that is not the question I am answering this week. Stay focused and on task!

In the case of my great-grandfather Millard, who lived his entire life in the Wayne, Boone and Kanawha Counties of West Virginia, I took all the census I could find and wrote down where he lived during those years. Nothing was very clear as either his father was a farmer or he was and there was no street location so I just picked an area close to the town noted or general area of the enumeration district. Next, I looked at the birth certificates or records of all his children, or those that had one online, so five out of eleven. I noted the locations and years and fit them between the census. I also looked at the marriage record which only stated Boone Co., not very helpful so when it came time to mark the map I put it somewhere near the birth of the children at that time.

Since I still do not have a death record I had to go by the obituary that said Millard died at home and after lots of digging I found where that home was located. I will detail that in my next post. After gathering all the dates I opened Google Earth Pro and in the My Places panel, I created a folder for Millard Stephens. I located the first place on my list and added a pin and made some notes (which do not show up in the movie). I added all the pins and created a tour. Next, I watched several Youtube videos to see how it was done and tried it out several times. I had to adjust a few places and move place markers etc till I got it where I wanted it. There is still one location that appears off to the left and I cannot figure that one out, not important though, you can still see it.

Here it is, my first ever Google Earth movie